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Can You Get Paid for Adoption-Related Expenses in New Mexico?

Does it cost to put a baby up for adoption in New Mexico? Do mothers get paid for adoption? Are there adoption agencies that pay you in New Mexico? Is adoption compensation for birth mothers possible?

At American Adoptions, we receive questions like the above pretty regularly. It makes complete sense; many women who unexpectedly become pregnant are very concerned about the impact on their finances. Whether you aren’t sure if you can afford all of the expenses that come with being a parent or you’re just wondering if financial assistance for adoption is a possibility, it’s certainly good to understand what your options are.

While some of the questions above have simple answers, others are more complicated. Below, we’ve addressed each one according to adoption laws in the state of New Mexico.

Does it cost to put a baby up for adoption in New Mexico?

Absolutely not. No matter which state you live in or what your circumstances are, it is free to put a baby up for adoption. In no situation should it ever cost you money to place your child for adoption. The government understands what a massive sacrifice this is for you, and while it may be physically and emotionally challenging, it should not be a financial hardship as well. No matter which adoption professional you choose to help you complete the adoption process, this is an unplanned pregnancy option that will always be completely free to you.

Do mothers get paid for adoption in New Mexico?

No. In no circumstance does a woman get paid to place her child for adoption. In fact, it is illegal to complete an adoption for compensation or profit. It is also illegal for hopeful adoptive parents to offer you money or anything of value in exchange for your agreement to place your child with them. You may, however, be eligible for adoption financial assistance in N.M. Continue reading to learn what that might consist of.

Are there adoption agencies that pay you in New Mexico?

Again, no. You do not get paid for adoption in New Mexico or anywhere else in the United States. You cannot get money to give baby up for adoption. However, as long as it follows the state’s guidelines, adoptive families can help you with certain pregnancy-related costs. See below for the type of adoption financial assistance allowed by the state of New Mexico.

Is adoption compensation for birth mothers possible?

To reiterate, it is illegal for anyone to offer to pay you in exchange for your decision to place your child for adoption. However, you may be eligible for adoption financial assistance in New Mexico in the form of an adoptive family paying the following expenses:

  • Medical, travel or other expenses related to the child’s birth or any illness of the child

  • Counseling service related to the adoption

  • Living expenses for a birth mother and her dependent children for a reasonable time both before and after placement

  • Legal services

  • Any other service or expense the court deems necessary relating to the adoption

These payments must be made by an adoption agency, the Children, Youth and Families Department, or by order of the court in an independent adoption situation. Also note that it is illegal to demand repayment of these expenses in order to complete parental consent for adoption.

To learn more about New Mexico financial assistance for adoption and whether or not you may qualify for it, please contact American Adoptions at 1-800-ADOPTION, or request free information here.

Disclaimer
Information available through these links is the sole property of the companies and organizations listed therein. America Adoptions, Inc. provides this information as a courtesy and is in no way responsible for its content or accuracy.

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